Little Kingshill

The village name 'Kingshill' is fairly self explanatory, meaning a hill in the possession of the king. Local folklore suggest it was King John who provided the name. The affix of 'Little' was added to the village name to segregate it from the adjacent hamlet which became Great Kingshill

The oldest building in the village is believed to be the farmhouse at Ashwell Farm in Windsor Lane, which it is claimed was used as a lodge by the King en route to Windsor, although Affrick's Farm in Watchet Lane was at an early date given to Godstow Nunnery, for it appears to have belonged to that house in 1291, and to have remained in its possession until its dissolution.

In 1541 it was granted by Henry VIII to Sybil Penn together with the manor of Beamond, and followed the same descent. (Source :A History of the County of Buckingham: Volume 2 (1908) )

The 1883 OS map shows five farms (including the two above), the Full Moon Pub, the Baptist Church and a few houses.

The first school building (now the nursery school) was built in 1887, previously pupils had been taught in the Baptist chapel.

Deep Mill was the site of a water mill and also cress beds which became a commercial operation on the arrival of the Metropolitan Railway in 1894. The presence of the railway also led to the planting of many cherry orchards in the village.

The Cricket Club was founded in 1898.

The village grew rapidly from the 1930ís onwards with a hotel, a second pub (the Prince of Wales) and a post office and general store. A new primary school building and village hall were provided in 1956.

However major development ceased in the 1970ís. The post office, store and hotel closed and bus services ceased a few years later.

The village has a large open area recreation ground with a children's play area in Windsor Lane.

Further information on the village can be found on the village society website.